Automatic Opt-in for Organ Donation.

SoapBox Forums Forum for Indian people living in the uk Automatic Opt-in for Organ Donation.

This topic contains 16 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  paki 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #1028

    oldfogie
    Participant

    My wife doesn’t do the news unless it’s quite local and directly affects her or hers. But even she was shouting at the radio this morning over the scheme to assume everyone has given permission to use their organs in the event of their untimely death. My wife cast doubt whether her 70+ year old bits are much use to anyone ( I promise, I never said a word!) especially if they were needed for someone younger. (I think she is rather fixed on hearts).

    But of course, the idea of assuming the lack of an opt-out is much different than the present opt-in method we have now by carrying a donor card.

    What does everyone think?

  • #1029

    Sai
    Participant

    Im a donor, and I opted in recently for some reason I can’t remember! (some form I had to fill in for something.. I clicked yes) anyway. Point being, I had to think really hard about it, to be honest. I don’t know why. I was more afraid to say to my family “im a donor” than to actually become a donor. It was just a difficult choice to make! Not that I think my organs are worth much but then I really made myself think that if im dead they’re only worm food..so if any part of my anatomy is of use to someone no matter how small then that’s a good thing. I won’t need them. In fact, I might be quite willing to donate my body to science or to be mummified or something! Thad is cool.

    I do think we should have a choice as to what happens after we die or are deemed “brain dead” but opting out covers that. So frankly there is no reason to not have a total opt-in law. How many people could potentially be saved and go on to lead happy healthy full lives..

  • #1030

    eee
    Participant

    I’ve had a donor card for decades. Maybe I hope I’ll be more use dead than I was alive …. although probably too old now to be of any use at all.

    I firmly believe that if you would consider the possibility you might ever need to make use of a donated organ yourself, you must of course also be willing to be a donor.

    So I’m in favor of automatic opt-in.

  • #1031

    Howard
    Participant

    Why let them go to waste is my view? it could make a massive difference in someone’s life.

  • #1032

    nomad
    Participant

    Anyone who feels sufficiently strongly about this issue will make the effort to opt out. For anyone who really doesn’t give much of a stuff either way and doesn’t bother to opt out (and wouldn’t have bothered to opt-in) then there is a multitude of desperate people who will be very grateful. Organ donation not only saves lives but improves life quality. As for your wife’s concerns regarding the use of sub-standard organs, I very much doubt thousands of £s would be wasted on transplanting any organ showing significant compromise for reasons of age or disease.

    • #1035

      Sai
      Participant

      @nomad This was actually one of the reasons I didn’t opt in sooner. I didn’t think my organs would be good enough anyway and didn’t want to waste the time of the hospitals testing them. Maybe @hopscotch could actually answer this for me: if you’re opted in – and die – do they look at your medical history before deciding to take anything or do they take it then test it? id never want to waste anyone’s time even dead lol

  • #1033

    hopscotch
    Participant

    I work in organ donation and I can tell you that even though it is changing to opt-out, the donor’s family will still get the final say as to whether donation goes ahead, and which organs and tissues will or will not be consented for (which is what happens now). The hospital will NOT go ahead with organ donation under any circumstances if the donor’s family decline donation. There are many rules and regulations in place to prevent donation going ahead without informed consent. The new opt-out rule has been put in place so that when the donor family is being approached regarding donation, it may make their decision easier if they know their loved one is on the Organ Donor Register/hasn’t opted out. There will also be safeguarding rules regarding under 18’s and people with limited capacity to understand the decision, and also for people who have been living in England for less that one year – these people will be exempt from the new rules.

    • #1034

      Sai
      Participant

      I work in organ donation and I can tell you that even though it is changing to opt-out, the donor’s family will still get the final say as to whether donation goes ahead, and which organs and tissues will or will not be consented for (which is what happens now). The hospital will NOT go ahead with organ donation under any circumstances if the donor’s family decline donation. There are many rules and regulations in place to prevent donation going ahead without informed consent. The new opt-out rule has been put in place so that when the donor family is being approached regarding donation, it may make their decision easier if they know their loved one is on the Organ Donor Register/hasn’t opted out. There will also be safeguarding rules regarding under 18’s and people with limited capacity to understand the decision, and also for people who have been living in England for less that one year – these people will be exempt from the new rules.

      Ok, so whats the point then? Surely the person’s views on it should trump the families? Or do they need an “I actually didn’t opt out because I didn’t want to” card?

      I understand it all for the under 18s/people at risk, but for a standard person, it shouldn’t matter.

    • #1036

      hopscotch
      Participant

      @sai The point is that it potentially makes the decision making for the donor family easier but it’s not, as has been said on the news, a silver bullet. I’m not a policy-maker, FWIW! Can you imagine how damaging it would be for the whole NHS organ donation “movement” if donors were taken off for donation when the family don’t agree?

      I’m not saying I agree or disagree with the new rules, I’m telling you why the new rules are being implemented. There is a vast shortage of organ donors and if this means we get more, and that it gets people discussing organ donation with their families and becoming embedded in our culture, then I find it difficult to think of it as wholly negative.

  • #1037

    ellen
    Participant

    I’m glad. I’ve considered being a donor for some time, but had an irrational fear that carrying the card might make doctors more inclined to save your organs than preserve what ever life might be left ( if god forbid in some sort of horrific accident).
    (I know I know, utter nonsense!)

    With this scheme we are all in from the get go. And as above, those against it are still free to opt out.

    I would be interested to find out however, what criteria are required to be met before you can receive an organ. Is it a bit like IVF? You have to be young and otherwise fit?

  • #1038

    jo
    Participant

    I have opted in since age 18, all my family know my wishes and there are only 2 organs that I don’t want donating. One for personal reasons and the other because our family is very prone to cancer in that organ (mother, 3 aunts and grandmother all definitely had it) and I would hate someone to go through the hell of an organ transplant only to end up with cancer

    I do think that an opt out system is far better, there are so many people out there that never quite get round to opting in, generally because it just slips their mind.
    If you feel strongly about it you will opt out, if you don’t feel that strongly about it then you may give someone else the chance of life or the chance to see thier children grow up.

  • #1039

    Aarav
    Participant

    I welcome it.

    I’m an organ-donor-in-waiting. I can only hope I am not a recipient in waiting, but who knows?

    I do understand the reasoning, but I am appalled that family members can overrule the wishes of a relative who has expressed a clear wish for their organs to be used to help others. I understand and accept that relatives should have a veto on the opt-out; I absolutely disagree that they have a veto on the opt-in. My body, my choice.

    I have left my body to science as a back up in case my organs are no good. I know the wishes of close family and will follow them.

    Why would I refuse to help someone live when I am dead and past caring?

  • #1040

    girly
    Participant

    I never got around to opting in part because it seemed pointless when your family could veto it and partly coz it was just one of those things I kept meaning to do, my family are all aware that in my opinion, the doctors are welcome to anything of any use whether that’s organ transplant or research. Hopefully changing to auto opt-in will make more people have discussions about what they want and if they don’t want to donate they will be more inclined to opt out than I was to opt-in and hopefully although it must be a horrid and emotional time for any relatives at least if they have had this conversation they will be more likely to carry out the person’s wishes.

  • #1041

    kat
    Participant

    I opted in decades ago and also made sure my relatives all know my feelings on the matter. It led to a fruitful family discussion, and within a few months the whole family had opted in.

    I think the “opt out” concept is excellent (those who are really against it for some reason can remove themselves – I also believe that opting out of giving should automatically opt someone out of receiving as well, but that’s probably a bit too biblical of me), BUT it doesn’t remove the necessity for continued discussion on the topic, publicly but also within families.

  • #1042

    eee
    Participant

    I think it appalling that we are in a situation where families can refuse to organ donation when the wishes were otherwise. I really don’t understand why this is still the case. It makes the whole opting in or out process into rather a farce IMO.

  • #1043

    eee
    Participant

    Can relatives also override the wishes of the deceased with regard to disposal of remains as expressed in a Will?

  • #1044

    paki
    Participant

    I’ve been a donor for years, and really hope, that if I am ever in the position to be able to donate any part of my body, that every single usable part is used! Equally, if I ever needed a transplant, I would hope that there would be suitable donors available. Simple really!

    I recently had a very frank and open discussion with my 10 yr old son about organ donation. He understands the process and, whilst thinking about it a bit ‘creepy’, fully understands the beneficial impact it can have on other people in need.

    All my family know my wishes, and I know theirs.

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