abdul

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • in reply to: Reheating curry and rice #1230

    abdul
    Participant

    Rice can be problematic if it has sat at room temperature for long enough to culture B. cereus. This bacteria is a problem because it produces a toxin that is heat-stable. Although thoroughly heating the rice will kill the bacteria itself, the toxin that makes you sick will remain. So, you should always be careful with rice.

    Having said that, rice has to hang around at room temperature or a little warmer for a while for this to happen. So, if you have put your rice straight into the fridge or freezer without leaving it lying around and then make sure that you heat it thoroughly it should be fine. The caveat is that if your rice has come from a takeaway, you don’t know how long it has been hanging around for before it gets to you.

    I do re-heat rice if I know it’s history (i.e., I cooked it) and I have never got sick from it, but I won’t re-heat rice if I don’t know exactly what has happened to it. I would never eat rice or rice salad from a buffet – the conditions there are far more likely to cause problems.

  • in reply to: My dentist has given me toothache :( #1158

    abdul
    Participant

    Currently on penicillin for similar infection underneath the rotten tooth (rear molar), following many toothaches, paracetamol and ibuprofen. The b****r is coming out in 2 weeks time, seems the easiest long-term solution for a bloke of my age.

    Memo to self, stock up on whisky first!

  • in reply to: How reliable has your car been? #961

    abdul
    Participant

    Pretty much every car we’ve had in the last 25 years has been reliable, but particularly the Octavia.

    Except for the Renaults. They were terrible.

    We’ve just got a Kodiaq – lots of things that could go wrong, but hopefully it’ll be OK.

  • in reply to: NHS pay #909

    abdul
    Participant

    1.3 million of them. Thats a hell of a percentage of the work force getting a rise at the expense of the rest of the work force, and yes I do know the NHS staff pay tax.

    @jane While I get where your coming from, the devil’s in the detail. This pay rise is heavily weighted towards the newly qualified in the lower pay bands, at a time when NHS bursaries are coming to an end and recruitment (even without Brexit) is in crisis.

    As an example, someone wanting to train as a paramedic now needs to commit to a 3 year Bsc at £9250 p.a. tuition, minimal holidays to earn extra cash and 50% of the time on placement (shifts) so hard to get part time work. Additional costs include a few hundred on textbooks, £60 for a stethoscope, a pulse oximeter, a few hundred for parking when on hospital placement, you’ve got to have your own vehicle to get to your placement stations and before you can get a job you’ll need to pass your C1 license (£800-1000).

    All this at a time when many studies are putting a newly qualified paras frontline career span at around 10 years due to high rates of mental and physical burnout.

    Current starting salary for a newly qualified paramedic – £22,000 (Band 5 basic, excluding unsociable hours pay at 25%).

    Market forces and all that, if you want skilled and professional people turning up to medical emergencies, you’ll have to provide wages that aren’t completely derisory.

  • in reply to: DIY building an inspection pit #900

    abdul
    Participant

    Have you seen the purpose made fibreglass liners for inspection pits?

    https://www.mech-mate.co.uk/

    You may need planning permission to dig one by the way……

  • in reply to: Exercising a dog on a lead – how hard is it? #866

    abdul
    Participant

    How easy is it to exercise a dog whilst it is kept on a lead? Or are the owners just lazy inconsiderate bar stewards?

    Depends exactly what you mean by exercise, the dog and the person.

    Retired greyhound and couch potato owner… no problem. Young collie and pretty much anyone… no chance.

    Not really sure why you’re asking, your issue appears to be the owner’s disregard for rules and no answer you get will change that.

  • in reply to: Can a new employer find out about previous salary? #834

    abdul
    Participant

    My understanding is that the person’s status as an employee may even qualify as protected data under GDPR.

    @abdul The term “protected data” has no meaning in the context of GDPR*. The term used is “personal data,” which is: “any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person”. So yes, your salary is personal data and your employer is legally obliged to protect it appropriately in order to avoid infringing any of your rights or freedoms (which would include the right to privacy under the ECHR). Anything the employer does with your personal data has to be covered by a “lawful basis of processing” – which in most cases will be one of: consent from the data subject; in order to fulfil a contract with the data subject; or because the data controller is legally obliged to process it (eg your employer has to know your NI number in order to fulfil their legal obligation to process your PAYE).

    As you say, there is no legal obligation to provide salary information in a reference. The lawful basis for processing in the case of a reference is almost certain to be consent (which must be freely and explicitly given, and recorded) and it should be clear when such consent is sought or given what categories of personal data the consent covers, and what use it will be put to. If the employee says: “don’t tell prospective new employers my salary” then the employer would almost certainly be breaking the law if they proceeded to do so.

    A diligent employer would state up front eg in their employee handbook what information they would provide in a reference, would collect and record the employee’s consent, and inform the employee that they have the legal right to challenge any part (or all) of it if they objected.

    * You might have been thinking of the term “sensitive personal data” which does exist in the DPA. That is replaced in GDPR by the term “special category data”. They are effectively the same in that the list basically consists of information about the data subject which could result in them being discriminated against illegally, per the Equality Act 2000. The word “sensitive” frequently caused confusion: many people would be extremely surprised to be told that their salary, bank account details and so forth are not regarded as “sensitive” information under the law. GDPR makes the situation clearer: all personal data is ‘sensitive’, but in differing degrees according to the impact that misuse/misappropriation of it might have on the rights and freedoms of the data subject. That’s what data controllers have to keep firmly in mind when processing personal data – and if they get it wrong then any regulatory penalties will take in to account the risk to the data subject’s rights and freedoms that the personal data represented.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by  abdul.
  • in reply to: Can a new employer find out about previous salary? #832

    abdul
    Participant

    People are perfectly entitled to ask for a higher salary from a new employer and the new employer will pay you what they think you are worth. No need to lie about previous salary just be honest (ish) about what you think you are worth.

  • in reply to: Can a new employer find out about previous salary? #831

    abdul
    Participant

    Without your explicit permission, your current HR department would be breaking the Data Protection Act 1998 if they told the new company your salary present salary – or indeed anything about you. If you put your current employer down as a reference then you may have given them such permission?

    @hoylcow I don’t think that’s the case. Employers have to give fair and accurate references. I see no way in which giving a person’s leaving salary could be described as unfair or inaccurate.

    http://m.acas.org.uk/index.aspx?articleid=5072

  • in reply to: Apple trolls #812

    abdul
    Participant

    I am not an apologist for Apple, and I have some concerns myself with regard to the way they treat developers for sure, however a recent experience makes me think that Apple do take their bugs seriously and have a efficient system for engaging users in trying to sort them out.

    I have a new iMac here and I had two problems; one was connecting to an external Drobo Hard Drive which kept restarting the iMac when I shut it down, and the second was the bluetooth keyboard that occasionally went bonkers and needed disconnecting and reconnecting. I posted threads on the Apple Community Forums about this and, a day later, had an engineer ringing from California requesting more details and actively working with me to help solve the problems.

    The problems haven’t been solved yet (it was only last week) but the procedure for trying to sort them was open and efficient and at no stage did the engineer get defensive about Apple.

    I have had other interactions with Adobe, who are much less responsive, and particularly Wacom, who basically suggest that any problem is someone else’s fault and nothing they can do anything about.

  • in reply to: Apple trolls #810

    abdul
    Participant

    I’m typing this on the same MacBook Pro I’ve had since 2009. Only thing I’ve done was clone the old hard drive to a new SSD. I’ve been pleased with this laptop but if this machine bit the dust tomorrow I couldn’t afford to replace it again. I also couldn’t really justify the cost given that they are under a fair amount of attack these days. That wasn’t an issue back when I bought it.

  • in reply to: Health anxiety following serious accident #758

    abdul
    Participant

    This is likely to be anxiety and I’ve been there with a loved one who rarely slept for six months for fear of dying from the ‘stomach ulcers’, the ‘brain tumour’, the ‘lung cancer’. I’m fairly sure that this anxiety was what led to an episode of anaphylaxis and the ensuing tests in hospital started to reassure him that there was nothing wrong.

    It was awful to watch and I swung between despair, sympathy, anger and fear that he really was very poorly.

    It wasn’t until I went to the doctor with him and told them that I was afraid for his life (because he was so anxious and depressed) that he began to comprehend that it might be all in his head. Finding the right GP, that he trusted, was vital.

    It’s non existent now and it’s hard to believe that it ever happened but it wasn’t easy. I think you should push him to begin exploring the ‘medical issues’ that he thinks he has. He needs to hear from professionals that his symptoms do not have a cause.

    One thing I wouldn’t do for much longer is offer any sympathy or understanding. Sometimes a harder approach is needed.

  • in reply to: When is the right age to retire? #748

    abdul
    Participant

    I retired at 50. I hated commuting into London, never had any time to do anything other than the essentials in the house at the weekend, no life outside of work and I just felt enough was enough. Best decision I ever made and I don’t regret it for a minute. It took me a while to relax and enjoy my new found freedom from the 5.28 on a Monday morning and I still got that feeling of dread on a Sunday evening for a while but not anymore. 4 years in and I am happier and healthier than I have been for years, I’ve gone from being a complete hermit to having 2 horses and friends I actually socialise with and I wouldn’t change it for the world.

    Go for it, retirement is what you make of it.

  • in reply to: Narcissism taking selfies? #744

    abdul
    Participant

    Social media seems to be the prime outlet for narcissists these days.

  • in reply to: Sheffield mayor bans Trump #1017

    abdul
    Participant

    @howard I know of several Sheffield residents in their 30’s who are pleased at his appointment. If you want to be critical of anybody, it would be Sheffield City Council and their awarding of a 25 year contract to AMEY and the ongoing debacle relating to their upkeep of the city and tree management. Nobody in business awards a 25 year contract without any get out clauses, unless there’s some kind of kickback in it for them, or they’re exceedingly daft. I think even a teenager wouldn’t do that, and Sheffield City Council of worldly wise adults have done.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)